Quantum Physics: From Magic to Reality



Before we begin, let us clarify that quantum physics is not a magical or mystical entity, but rather a study of small things.

Also, quantum physics is a very complex topic, and scientists themselves do not understand many aspects of it, thus many many things are still open to further research, so please feel free to tell me if I get something incorrect in this post.

The study of matter and energy behaviour at the atomic and subatomic levels is known as quantum physics. It's regarded as one of physics' most difficult and complicated fields. Quantum physics has helped the development of technology such as lasers and transistors, as well as giving scientists a better understanding of the universe at its most basic level.

The science of the very small is often referred to as quantum physics. Because quantum physics is involved with objects that are too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as atoms and particles, this is the case. We already know from quantum physics that these tiny things can act in odd and unexpected ways.




Quantum tunnelling is one of the most well-known examples of this. This occurs when a particle, such as an electron, slips past a barrier that, according to classical physics, it should not be able to pass over. Electrons, on the other hand, have a chance of passing through barriers that they would otherwise be unable to penetrate due to its wave-like nature.

This phenomena was originally detected in radioactive decay experiments, where it was discovered that some particles (such as electrons) were able to escape from their nuclei despite it having insufficient energy to do so according to classical physics. Quantum tunnelling has been discovered in a variety of other situations since then, and it has important uses in current technology, such as semiconductor devices like transistors.



Entanglement is another strange phenomenon predicted by quantum mechanics. This happens when two particles become linked in such a way that they can share information instantly, no matter how far apart they are. "Spooky action from afar," as Einstein famously put it. Entanglement has been demonstrated many times in experiments, and it is widely used in modern quantum computing research.

When compared to our everyday experience, which is governed by classical physics, quantum mechanics can produce results that appear magical or puzzling. Even more than a century after quantum mechanics was first developed, the strange behaviour of matter at the atomic scale continues to amaze physicists. The more we learn about quantum physics, the more fascinated we become with its strange and wonderful rules.
Just Myself

I like writing about Science, games and free software.

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